PRESENTERS
Francisco Ortega

Dr. Francisco is Associate Professor in Graphic Design and Coordinator of the PhD Fine Arts program at the School of Art, Texas Tech University (TTU). He earned his undergraduate degrees and MA at the University of Texas, El Paso, and his PhD in Critical Studies and Artistic Practice at TTU (2008). A practicing artist and scholar, his interests include: Historical and Critical Perspectives in Animation, Game Design Theory and History, Graphic Design, and Interdisciplinarity in the Arts. He collaborates with Dr. Jorgelina Orfila in a research project that explores the interactions between animation and contemporary art, and with Dr. SueAnne Lee in a project that uses animation for teaching new words to children with language disabilities. He is author of “De Top Cat a Don Gato: Acerca del Doblaje en Animación,”(co-authored with Dr. Jorgelina Orfila) Con A de Animación 8 (Spring 2018): 150-163; and “Board(er) Games: A Case Study on the Creation of Socially-Based Board Games,” in Jason C. Thompson, Marc A. Ouellette (Eds.), The Game Culture Reader, Newcastle upon Tyne, U.K: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013, 210-229. Among his animations are: “The Revenge of a Finger,” Toilets’ chronicles, (2016), “Titans: Analogies on a City,” (2012). 

Presentation Information

The Effect of Animation in Learning Novel Words in Children with Specific Language Impairment.

The proposed project is an interdisciplinary collaborative research effort between two disciplines: Art (Dr. Ortega) and Health, in particular, speech pathology (Dr. Lee). The purpose of the proposed project is to examine whether animated art materials help children with specific language impairment (SLI) acquire novel words more effectively than static art materials. Dr. Ortega at TTU will be responsible for creating animated and static art materials for experiments. Dr. Lee at TTUHSC will be assisting with the experiments and responsible of data analysis.

The proposed study will utilize the eye-tracking system to measure attention more objectively in children with SLI.

Key words

language learning, instructional animation, cognitive theory, multimedia instruction

Contact Details

Francisco.ortega@ttu.edu

Websites:  fog-site.com and ludoztli.com

Tessie Liddell

Tessie Liddell is from Griffith Film School in Australia who is investigating how narrative driven animation can be used to communicate conservation science in affective and engaging ways. She has completed 2 solo films, one screening at the National Maritime Museum in Sydney and the other being a collaborative project with environmental research group SNAPP: Ridges to Reef. Tessie is currently working on 2 collaborative projects with different groups of scientists, one with Healthy Land and Water and the other part of an artist residency with the Eco Sciences Precinct in Brisbane.  Her hobbies include drawing animals, eating watermelon and being in the forest.

Presentation Information

A Case for Collaboration: Where Science Meets Creativity

Collaboration is about balance, it’s about cooperation, and it’s about working together to create something larger than the sum of its parts. Animation, as a form of visual story telling lends itself to collaborative approaches, in communicating the ideas and experiences of others. 

However, when it comes to disseminating science, the balance of collaboration is often lost in favour of traditional forms of instruction which utilize animation as a visual tool for primarily diagrammatic purposes, frequently employing text and authoritative narration as the primary means of communication. 

Despite the popularity of this format, many educators in STEM are of the opinion that traditional, lecture-based learning is not only boring but can also be ineffective and counterproductive (Freeman et al. 2014). Such educators advocate for a model that engages the learner in active participation.  

So how can a more balanced approach to collaboration between animators and scientists be leveraged for an engaging and clear communication of science? How might viewers engage with information, as well as challenge the way that they perceive and relate to the world around them?

As part of my ongoing research project I have explored what this collaborative approach might look like, engaging with scientists in an effort to produce animations that address ecological/environmental concerns. Based on scientific research, and under the supervision of experts in their fields, the films maintain a level of educational functionality whist operating under a narrative-driven, visual approach. The process, outcomes and reception of these collaborations indicate great potential for learning devices which break the didactic mould and inform through a visual experience driven by story and subtle messaging.

Key words

collaboration, animation, environmental-science, affect, communication, narrative

Contact Details
Victor Jeganathan

Victor holds a BSc in Product Design from Brunel University and a MSc in Ergonomic and Inclusive Design from Loughborough University. Currently he is a PhD student within the Design School studying guide running for the visually impaired (VI) funded by Loughborough University and Design Star consortium.

The research stems from an MSc project aiming to help VI children run with an assistive device. Which led to Loughborough Entrepreneurial grant to build equipment that would aid visually impaired children to run in a safe environment.

 

His research revolves around how the VI use guide runners to navigate an environment and the challenges the community face. The aim being that better understanding of guide running can help inform the guide running community and help develop tools to aid running independently.

 

While his strengths lie within inclusive design, he has also worked professionally as a graphic designer and as an assistant researcher on various projects. He is very much aware of the odd juxtaposition his graphic design skills has with his visual impairment PhD.

Presentation Information

The rear end of my PhD: why I have been staring at buttocks for the last 6 months

The rear end of my PhD is a short video (8 minutes) made for an internal conference, as a light-hearted approach of explaining the research troubles of my PhD. Later, the talk was published on Reddit resulting in 15,000 views on YouTube and a lot of comments. 

For this informal talk I would like to showcase the video, spend a bit of time looking at the public and academic reaction, what was learnt from this method of communication, how this fits in with an academic’s role, and possibly how academics could use this method to maximum effect.

Key words

Visual Impairment, Guide running, Audience engagement, video editing, Social Media, outreach

Contact Details
Susan Young

Susan Young is a BAFTA-nominated animation director based in London.

Carnival, her Royal College of Art graduation film, features the fluid line that defines her commercial work. Commissioned films include The Doomsday Clock, a film about multilateral disarmament for the United Nations, Beleza Tropical for musician David Byrne, and Jimi Hendrix: Fire, for producer Alan Douglas.

Susan’s films, titles, promos and commercials have been screened worldwide and she has served on several international animation festival juries. In 1997 she unfortunately sustained an overwork-related hand injury that prevented her from drawing and animating for many years. 

Susan is currently based at the Royal College of Art, London, where she is studying animation’s capacity as a medium for processing psychological trauma. As part of this research she is working on a trilogy of autobiographical experimental films, including It Started With a Murder (2013) and The Betrayal (2015). 

Susan has recently recovered from her hand injury and returned to drawn animation, making the film Dead Reckoning (2016), in collaboration with director Paul Wenninger. On completing her PhD, Susan will continue with post-doctoral research, develop short and longer form film projects, and return to commissioned filmmaking.

Presentation Information

Arts-Based Research, New Materialism and Autoethnography

Situated within an arts-based framework, my research questions how animation can be used as a medium for processing psychological trauma. My interest in this proposition stems from personal experience of using animation to cope with historical trauma. Methodologically I am combining autoethnographic animation practice (to reflexively explore personal trauma narratives), and qualitative analysis (to generate insights into how animation might help reduce trauma symptoms).

This paper examines whether an interdisciplinary approach such as this can be appropriately situated within the onto-epistemological frame of new materialism.  Materialist ontology focuses less on individual bodies, ideas and things, and more on processes and the flow of affect between ‘assemblages’ – the material, social and abstract entities accruing around actions and events (Deleuze and Guattari, 1988). My own research-assemblage includes: researcher – questionnaire  ­­– theoretical framework. My creativity-assemblage includes: animator – personal narrative ­­– animation experiments­ – audience. Is it possible to study these disparate bodies, ideas, memories and cognitions as an ecology of relations within an assemblage? How might each component affect, or be affected by, the others? In this presentation I discuss how my assemblages encourage a ‘rich and rhizomic flow of affect’ (Deleuze and Guattari, 1994), that promotes psychological change and facilitates new ways of thinking about animation and trauma.

Key words

Arts-Based Research, autoethnography, new materialism, agential realism, animation, trauma

Contact Details
Jorgelina Orfila

Dr. Jorgelina Orfila is Associate professor in 20th and 21st century Art History and Critical Theory at Texas Tech University. She earned undergraduate degrees in art history in Argentina. From 1997 to 1999, she was a Lampadia Fellow in the Department of French Paintings at the National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C. In 2007, she earned a Ph.D. in art history from the University of Maryland. Her research interests include: Historiography of Art History, History of Museology, Art of the 1930s, Animation and Modern and Contemporary Art, Photography/ Photojournalism in the Interwar Period, Media Archeology, Cognitive Theory. Together with Dr. Francisco Ortega, she is working on a publication that will examine the intersections of animation and the fine arts in 20th and 21st centuries. Among her latest publications are “De Top Cat a Don Gato: Acerca del Doblaje en Animación,”(co-authored with Dr. Francisco Ortega) Con A de Animación 8, (Spring 2018): 150-163; “John Rewald's transatlantic scholarship: A forgotten chapter in the art history of modern art,” (11,500 words). Geraldine Johnson’ (Ed), Exile and Expatriate Histories of Art, Routledge, Forthcoming 2018; “On Art History and Meta-Images: Art Reproductions, Site Photographs, and Cézanne’s Art,” in Claus Clüver, Matthijs Engelberts, and Véronique Plesch (Eds.), L’Imaginaire: texte et image / The Imaginary: Word and Image. Word and Image Interactions 8. Amsterdam and New York: Brill/Rodopi, 2015, 303-316. 

Presentation Information

Mind and Body Engagement: Enjoyment + Training through Animated Music Video Games.

Created in the late 90s, the Bemani games (Konami's music video game division) invite players to synchronize their body and hand movements to the sound of popular songs, a display of animated images that include a set of key colored musical cues that guide the player’s actions. In addition of providing visual and auditory gratification when a song is well-played, these games offer the satisfaction that derives from improving performance skills, better scores, winning confrontations with another/s player/s, and on-screen audience’s approval.

 

Hailed as a new synesthetic exercise, these games belong to a participatory tradition that—within the field of animation—harks back to the turn of the 20th century. In 1924, for example, the Fleischer’s brothers created the “follow the bouncing-ball” technique for the series Song Car-Tunes. These “pre-talkies” animations enjoined spectators to sing the corresponding words when a white ball tapped on top of the lyrics. In this way, these cartoons subverted the industry’s strategies to quash public participation with the goal of producing the respectfully screen-oriented cinema audience we now consider canonical (Altman). The Bemani games took advantage of the latest digital technology to expand this participatory tradition by offering an interactive environment that engaged mind and body and promoted skill improvement.  

 

Although tunes for toons (music for cartoons) and the visual music film have been the subject of much scholarly attention, the use of animated images in productions that offer the public a participatory experience has been less explored. This paper uses cognitive theory and approaches that call attention to animation as an audio-visual medium, in order to shed light on musical video games as the latest iteration of an, until now, understudied set of practices within the animation canon.

Key words

cognitive theory, music video games, bouncing ball, Fleischer brothers, participatory art

Contact Details
Avishkar Chhetri

Avishkar Chhetri was born in Porkhara Nepal and grew up in West London. 

He graduated with highest honours from Kingston College School Of Art & Design in Digital Arts specialising in Animation, Digital Illustration and Concept Design. 

Avishkar's main focus is in political commentary, investigative journalism, documentary filmmaking, and animation. He is currently researching socio-economic changes in his childhood estate - South Acton estate as it is going through housing regeneration. Avishkar uses auto-ethnography as a way to explain mono-tenured estates like South Acton estate which comprises of mainly working-class social renters. This interests him as the current redevelopment scheme of housing in the UK is to relinquish mono-tenured estates and replace them with mixed communities therefore preventing "sink estates".

Presentation Information

A showing of 'Dear His Majesty' presented by the Director Avishkar Chhetri. 

 

As a filmic format, 'Dear His Majesty' is constructed as a direct message to the King of Bhutan in an open-letter fashion. After consulting with refugees and investigators Chhetri summises the message to singular sentences and informational allegorical depictions.

Key words

Open-Letter, Refugee, Bhutan, Nepal, Investigation, Activism

Contact Details

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Nor Hazlen Kamaruddin

Nor Hazlen has worked as a graphic designer in publication design for magazines for many years. From industry, she pursued a Masters degree in Visual Communication and New Media at MARA University of Technology, Malaysia, then went on to teach at Sultan Idris Education University. She has won several awards for her achievements in the graphic design field; has been awarded a scholarship from the Academic Training Scheme of Higher Education Institutions of Malaysia to pursue a PhD at the School Of The Arts, English and Drama, Loughborough University. She is also involved in design research and consultancy work in graphic design, publication design, branding and corporate identity for companies and government organizations. 

Presentation Information

Sustaining Preschool Children’s Attention Span Through the Manipulation of a Graphic Element (colour) in a Digital Picturebook Design

This paper explores how to sustain the attention span of children, aged 4–6 years, through visual images in a digital picturebook in order to encourage them to read. The study involves analysing a graphic element of design; colour. Sustained attention is defined as maintaining focus over long periods (Jongman, Roelofs, & Meyer, 2015) and visual images play an important role in sustaining the attention of children (Carnie & Levin, 2002). Thus, the central question asked by this study is: How does manipulating the ‘colour’ of visual images with respect to the visual language affect children’s attention span on the digital picturebook?

This study is conducted in the researcher’s home country of Malaysia, in the KEMAS preschool setting where the children hail primarily from low-income families. These children require extensive academic support to encourage them to read because literacy is a vital contributer to academic success (RIF, 2015). Success in education is perceived as an avenue through which children can escape the cycle of poverty (Hasan, Hyson, & Chang, 2013). For this research project, the Tobii T120 eye-tracking device was used to measure the said attention in the first stages of investigation. 

Key words

Colour combination, colour contrast, visual images, sustained attention, picturebook

Contact Details
Ash Routen

Dr Ash Routen is a Research Associate in the School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences at Loughborough University. He has 10 years of experience working in schools on children’s health research.

Presentation Information

CLASS PAL (Physically Active Learning)

The 2016 UK government Childhood Obesity strategy tasked schools with providing 30 minutes of physical activity per day for pupils. A number of strategies to meet this goal were recommended, including physically active lessons. Little is known however on how schools implement physical activity in the classroom, and how they can be best supported to do so. This presentation presents a case study of CLASS PAL, a support package to enable primary school teachers to deliver physical activity in the classroom. A focus of this presentation will be on the development and use of an animation video to advocate classroom physical activity with teachers and schools.

Key words

chools, Physical Activity, Health, Education

Contact Details

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Elis Mokhtar

BFA (painting), MFA (painting/drawing), a painter and an educator (teaching painting and drawing). Granted an award from the Academic Training Scheme of Higher Education Institutions of Malaysia and Sultan Idris Education University, Malaysia to pursue a PhD in Loughborough University. My artworks have been exhibited in various galleries in Malaysia, Singapore, Philippines, Thailand (1997-2015), The Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, and Portugal (2000-2009).

Presentation Information

The development of a self-help tool-kit: a hybrid approach of person-centred therapy and visual journaling for prolonged grief disorder

This paper reports on my PhD study to develop a self-help tool-kit, a hybrid of person-centred therapy and visual journaling, that encourages users to be honest and positive with themselves while drawing images to release negative emotions of grief. My investigation comprised an auto-ethnographic study; I examined the hybrid approach to design the art exercises that focused on using lines, shapes, and colours in the consideration of feelings, while having a compassionate conversation with oneself following step-by-step instructions. Two prototypes of the toolkit have been initiated and tested with a group of volunteers. The first prototype was explored the practicality of the toolkit comprising 14 exercises and basic drawing tools from pencils to markers, with one exercise completed each day. Based on the collected data, I refined the toolkit and redesigned the exercises. I also revised the drawing tools to use only pens and coloured markers. The second prototype consisted of 30 exercises; 16 basic exercises and 14 advance exercises for the participants to practice independently for 30 days. Consequently, participants received the benefits of exercising the toolkit. The tool-kit was used as an interactive workbook that helped them shifted negative emotions to positive ones, gained confidence in drawing and describing their feelings, self-reflected, reduced stress, and recorded their life experiences and personal emotions.

The outcomes of this study are anticipated to provide a new

tool that may be used in a clinical setting to help individuals who are suffering from prolonged grief

disorder. The tool will reduce symptoms and help people move on with their lives.

Key words

Self-help, drawing and tools, person-centred therapy, visual journaling, prolonged grief.

Contact Details